Removing Old Carpet Step by Step with Photos

Removing Old Carpet

REMOVING OLD CARPET

You know you need to.  The carpet is either gross or it’s not your style or you just don’t want any carpet in your house due to allergies or cleanliness.  In my Sanibel 103, it was all of the above.  You’ve come to the right place for Removing Old Carpet Step by Step with Photos.

So, let’s just start.

Tools for removing old carpet
Start by gathering the right tools for removing old carpet.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

GETTING STARTED

Depending on the job (mine was the ENTIRE house!!), you might prepare for this one room at a time.  Besides, it’s impossible to do all rooms at once if you’re living through the renovation like I was.

I started in the upstairs bedrooms, and that meant removing all furniture including mattresses…which meant sleeping on an air mattress downstairs in the living room.  For six weeks.  Ugh… But it was worth it.  Just start!

All of these steps and photos are from my guest bedroom remodel.  It was fun learning and doing and succeeding!  Follow along step by step.  There are ALOT of photos to illustrate everything.  I hope you’ll enjoy it.  [Maybe next time I’ll make a video.]

CAN YOU REUSE ANY OF THE OLD CARPET?

Think about any uses you may have for sections of the old carpet.  In my case, the bedroom carpets weren’t that bad directly under the beds.  I decided to rescue the best sections and use them in the garage, in my workshop area, or as a drop cloth when painting.  It’s easy to move them around when/where I need them, and otherwise keep the taped rolls or a small stack of flat carpet sections in the garage out of the way.

Save some sections when removing old carpet
Can you rescue some of the old carpet? Measure out the best sections, and cut these with a sharp box knife.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

So, measure the section(s) you want to keep.  Using a sharp utility or box knife, make a cut line all the way through the carpet and pad.  This isn’t as easy as it sounds unless you have a super sharp utility knife.  I prefer the large box knives that have those blades that snap off when they’re dull.  I had to snap to a new blade several times, but it cut fairly easily and quickly this way.

Ok. Gather your tools.  Put on your gloves, knee pads, and dust mask.  Consider safety goggles if you want to keep dust out of your eyes.  Now, head to the nearest corner. Grab your needle nose pliers.  And just pull upwards.

Removing Old Carpet
Removing Old Carpet? Get, ready, start!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pull up the best section to where your cut lines are, roll it up, tape it off, and set aside for future use elsewhere.  Be glad you’re wearing your dust mask if you have allergies because mine had a lot of fibers and dust flying everywhere.

Reusing old carpet
Plan to save the best sections of the old carpet and rescue these from ending up in the landfill. You’ll soon realize how handy a couple of these sections will be.
Reusing old sections of carpet
Neatly tape up the best sections for later use.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

REMOVE THE TACK STRIPS

Thank you for rescuing some of the best carpet sections from the landfill.  By now you’ve discovered what’s under the carpeting: Tack strips, nails, and staples — oh, my!  And carpet padding.

Carpet tack strips
Tack strips will be your worst enemy, but they are a key part of the job of removing old carpet.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tack strips are the biggest pain.  They are installed all along the perimeter of the room to secure the carpet in place so it doesn’t wrinkle and bunch up over time.  They are a necessary evil but your worst enemy when removing old carpet.

The tack strips have a million sharp tacks sticking up so they can be tricky and dangerous.  I know you’re wearing gloves, right?  Be aware and be careful!

Old carpet tacks
Beware: millions of sharp carpet tacks are waiting to meet you once the carpet is removed.

 

 

Removing old carpet tack strips
Notice irregular small pieces of tack strips were installed around door moldings and in corners.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sometimes there are more than one generation of carpeting, thus carpet tack strips.  Sanibel 103 had two sets of carpeting since 1975, both with their tack strips in place.  Translation:  twice the work!  The photo below shows both sets of tack strips.  They are like vintage wooden yardsticks with millions of tacks waiting to stick you.

Old carpet tack strips.
Part of removing old carpet means deal with vintage tack strips and old foam padding held together with mesh.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

So, that’s what you’ll find and that’s what you’ll have to remove.  You can remove the padding first if you want.  I did that in some sections but not the whole room at once since it did provide some padding for my knees.  ALL of this work is on your knees.

My favorite tools for removing tack strips are a good ole hammer and a large flathead screwdriver.  Still wearing kneepads, gloves, dust mask, and now safety glasses in case of flying nails and tacks, lay the screwdriver on its side, slide the tip under the wooden tack strip, and hit the end of the screwdriver with your hammer to loosen the strip.

Removing old carpet with screwdriver and hammer
Remove tack strips using a large flathead screw driver and a hammer. WHACK!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I found that the tack strip broke at every large nail that was holding it to the plywood subfloor.  So the screwdriver loosened about 8-12 inches at a time before the strip broke off at a nail.

Tack strip removal
Remove tack strips one small section at a time. Usually the nails holding the tack strip to the plywood or concrete will prevent you from removing long strips because the wooden strip will break at each nail.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Keep loosening the tack strips all around the room, and deal with the nails later…

Tack strip terminology
Removing old carpet terminology: tack vs nail

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Properly dispose of sharp tack strips in a cardboard box that you can securely tape up before putting in the trash or dumpster.  You can see the small sections of tack strips in my box below.  Sometimes I had to break the strips into shorter sections with my hammer if they came up longer than would fit in the box.

Disposing of sharp tack strips
Please dispose of sharp tack strips in a sturdy cardboard box that can be taped shut so no one gets hurt.

REMOVING THE NAILS

Congratulations if you’ve removed all the tack strips.  Now might be a good time for a break so your poor knees can rest.  Yuengling was my beverage of choice.  Even though this is a Pennsylvania beer and favorite of Pittsburghers, Yuengling can be found everywhere in SW Florida.  Lucky me!

taking a break from removing old carpet
Learn how to take a proper break when removing old carpet. [smile]

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Break over.  Back to work!  Now you have a lot of nails to deal with.  The nails held the tack strips in place so once the sharp tack strips are safely in their cardboard trash box, you can grab your claw hammer and start pulling out the bigger nails one by one.  Lay a scrap piece of lumber behind the claw of the hammer for extra leverage on the stubborn nails.

Nails when removing old carpet
Removing old carpet means dealing not only with sharp tacks but also with big nails — lots of them!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Invariably there will be nails close to the walls in each corner.  These are an extra pain to remove unless you can get to them at at a different angle.  When facing nails in a very tight corner with no room for a hammer, try pliers or vise grips or whatever you can find to get the job done.  Easier said than done, trust me.

Vise grip to remove nails in tight corners
Use whichever tool you have to in order to get those stubborn nails out of tight corners. Sometimes a vise grip worked for me.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Removing tack strip nails in tight corners
Use whichever tool you have to in order to get those stubborn nails out of tight corners.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Box full of tack strips
A box full of old tack strips is a good sign that you’re almost done removing old carpet! 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

YOU ARE DONE!!

Whew.  Take a step back and admire your hard work.  Tack strips and all big nails are done.  Can you believe it?  Way to go!

Done with removing old carpet
DONE with removing old carpet from the guest bedroom. Don’t even think about what is next…

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Don’t even think about the next step yet.  Time to get your mind off of flooring and celebrate your success and hard work.  There’s no place like the beach for that!

Sanibel Island Florida for removing old carpeting
The best place for removing old carpeting is Sanibel Island, Florida!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Stay tuned for the next step in my Sanibel 103 guest bedroom DIY remodeling project.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pittsburgh House Remodel

Pittsburgh, PA house

FLASHBACK TO 4 YEARS AGO…

Pgh = Pittsburgh

This was my favorite house of all times (so far), and Pittsburgh was one of my most favorite places to live (so far).  Considering how many times I’ve moved, I can claim to be somewhat of an expert in this arena.  Pittsburgh truly is lovely.  A lot of people don’t know that and think it’s a dirty steel and coal town, but they’d be wrong.  We’ll just keep it a secret then.  Because of the unique way that Pittsburgh is spelled, it’s locally and affectionately referred to as Pgh.

My Pgh House was custom built by someone else in 1984 and sat on 3 lots which totaled one acre.  The previous owner spared no detail!   This house was so unique and had so much character that I couldn’t resist. It was love at first sight.  “Character” means different things depending on your style tastes; sometimes “character” is another person’s “OMG! NO WAY”.  I’m sure that was the case for some buyers but not for me.  To me, I just bought 4000 square feet of potential in what was going to be my “forever” house.

Sadly, though, this was not to be.  I was transferred to Scotland UK with my job, so I had to sell.  Heartbroken doesn’t even describe it.  Actually, I’m still not completely over it almost 4 years later.  Boo.

The two saddest words: FOR SALE
The two saddest words: FOR SALE

But, let’s back up to when I thought I’d be there forever. Shortly after moving in, I had the badly weathered cedar-sided exterior stained a sand color and the door painted red (much to the neighbor’s disapproval).  I wanted to at least make the outside look “mine” while I decide how to tackle the massive job of remodeling and updating the inside.

Obviously, the pink and purple bedrooms and the baby blue basement had to go, so painting these were next.  And while I loved most of the old-school 80’s retro features like the spiral staircase to the master bedroom, the indoors cedar-sided hot tub room off the family room, the awesome double-sided flagstone fireplace, the ladder-accessed loft in one of the bedrooms …  every single room needed to be updated.  So much potential, too little time and too little money.  I figured I’d get to it eventually since this was going to be my “forever” house.  Or so I thought…

Pgh-fireplace from family room
The massive stone fireplace straddled the family room and the sunken conversation pit. Yes, I know. But it was still awesome!
The master bedroom was HUGE but it was painted a greenish taupe and had a lace wallpaper border all around. You should have seen the light fixture before I traded it for the drum pendant...
The master bedroom was HUGE but it was painted a greenish taupe and had a lace wallpaper border all around. Yes, terrible…

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Loft in one of the bedrooms. Keep thinking how much potential this house had...
Loft in one of the bedrooms. Keep thinking how much potential this house had…

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Looking down into the foyer. I did actually love that gray tile entry.
Looking down into the foyer. I did actually love that gray tile and the glass-panel double front doo

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

But the master bathroom?  Yikes!!  OMG, TONS of updating to do.  The three best features it had going for it were: 1) GIGANTIC size, 2) super high vaulted ceiling, and 3) a great skylight.  (maybe the bidet counted as #4?)  Hee-hee…

Pgh m bath 3-WM
Yes, this was a pink and gray bathroom, complete with bidet!
Pgh bath remodel 002-WM
Extra long Jacuzzi tub didn’t work as a whirlpool but it was a nice soaking tub if I didn’t have to look at pink tile. During the remodel, I discovered mold hiding behind a large framed print over the tub, so that made it even worse!
bath remodel 009
I don’t know why they had such a tiny shower “closet” in such a huge bathroom…probably because the bidet was taking up so much precious real estate!

 

bath remodel 004-WM
Double vanity seemed crowded because of a large linen closet wall to the right of it.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I’ll save you the “during” shots but suffice it to say that the demo was a total gut job and the remodeling ran into a lot of problems with out-of-square plaster walls, hidden brick chimney behind the linen closet, code requirements, snowy winter weather.  Everything was done by contractors due to time constraints; no DIY this time.  It was finished only two months before I had to move to Scotland…

Pgh MBath remodel-entry
Master Bathroom: custom built extra long vanity to accommodate this strange shape. I loved the onyx tile countertop, lighted make-up mirror, frosted glass-front lower cabinets…

Linen closet wall was removed to allow room for an expanded vanity surface and lots of storage.  Custom-built vanity, cabinets, tub surround.  Bidet removed, toilet moved, large walk-in glassed shower, Kohler lighting, Moen fixtures.

Pgh MBath Remodel-shower
Massively high ceiling, modern ceiling fan, large glassed-in shower.
Pgh MBath Remodel-tub
Master Bath AFTER (2013). Pleasing orange accent wall under the skylight made this large bathroom feel so sunny. Dimmer on the chandelier over the whirlpool tub added just the right ambiance for late night bubble baths.

Although I didn’t get to finish any other remodeling projects or long enjoy the bathroom, the new owners said the remodeled master bath was the selling point to an already awesome home.  Sigh…I really miss my Pgh House.

Sanibel Stairs DIY Makeover, Phase 1

Millions of evil carpet staples

Sanibel No. 103 Stairs DIY Makeover, Phase 1

Of course my Sanibel No. 103 remodeling project will include a major stairs makeover by removing the old 1975 carpet and replacing the outdated metal railing.  No brainer, right?  And since stairs seem pretty technical with building codes and all that metal (torches and welding), this wasn’t going to be a DIY project.  Trust me when I say there are TONS more DIY projects to tackle in this house!  But what I didn’t expect was that this would indeed turn into Sanibel Stairs DIY Makeover, Phase 1.

Here’s what the stairs looked like when I bought my Sanibel townhouse.  Very dated, plus it felt like I was in someone else’s house — or their grandma’s house.

Sanibel stairs before before
Existing condition of the stairs when I bought my Sanibel townhouse. White and beige looked too blah and sparse in this turnkey condo.

I had to make some changes to make it my own but couldn’t justify spending much money on it since I bought this as a vacation home and wouldn’t be moving in full time for a few years.  So although I couldn’t address the major issues of carpet and railing, I could perform a little DIY magic:

  • Remove the ugly faded prints of swans from their gold frames.
  • Purchase an inexpensive white wicker thrift store mirror with an interesting shape.
  • Spray paint the wicker mirror a glossy black.
  • Retain some of the previous owner’s frames and glass; paint them black.
  • Convert some of my favorite Sanibel beach photos to sepia-tone and have them enlarged to various sizes at our local Sanibel CVS pharmacy.
  • Pair photos with frames, trimming some photos as needed to create a gallery wall up the stairs.
  • Paint the top railing of the iron banister a glossy black for contrast against the white balusters and to tie to the black frames.
  • Compete the look by a bright red painted wall under the stairs.
Red wall under the stairs at Sanibel
Sanibel Stairs DIY Makeover, Phase 1 after I painted the top railing black and the wall red.
Sanibel FL stairs-BEFORE
Sanibel No. 103 stairway. This is the best I could do with it until THE REMODEL which is happening now.

Not bad for about $60 bucks and a couple of hours of stimulating DIY work.

***So, did my changes improve the look of the stairs or not? Post a comment to give me your opinion.*** 

I felt that with these small, more personal changes, I could live with the stairs until I moved in full-time.  Which is now.  Meanwhile, back to today’s remodeling plans for the stairs…

Like you, I love-love Pinterest and spent hours pinning inspirational photos of what I wanted my new stairs to look like.  Here are my top favorites:

This one is from Leo Designs Chicago.  I love every room in their transitional gallery

Sanibel stair railing wish-list
Beautiful contemporary stair railing for inspiration.

OMG, love-love this railing (unknown original source):

Contemporary chrome stair railing
Stunning contemporary staircase railing. But can this work in my Sanibel beach condo? Hmmmm….

 

This one is a fun beachy-keen style.  (NOTE: unfortunately this image is no longer found on House of Turquoise; please write a comment if you know the original source)

Shades of beachy blue painted stairs
Loving the rustic, beachy, lived-in look of this stairway paint job.

And check out the ombre paint job on this HGTV one and others…or is it Anthony Carrino that makes this staircase look so dreamy!

HGTV Cousins Undercover gray painted staircase
Anthony and John reconstructed the staircase by giving it an opening to allow light in, and giving it a paint design on each step with different shades of gray as seen on HGTV’s “Cousins Undercover”.

Be sure to check out my other Stairway Pins.

MEANWHILE… I talked to my remodeling contractor.  He connected me with his stairs expert.  The stairs expert checked it out, measured, and (eventually) sent me the quote to replace treads, risers, and railings:

OMG …  $10,237!          What?!?!          No way!  

I’m still not over the shock (can you tell?), but I had to slap myself, get a grip, snap out of it, regroup, and move on.  Plan B, C, and maybe D will depend on what I find under the carpeting on the stairs ….

(Hint:  it’s not good…)

stair remodeling estimate
$10k for new steps? NO WAY!  Can I live with stain, paint, and some wallpaper border?  Stay tuned for the answer to this pressing question…

Obviously these stairs were built to always have carpet on them because they are constructed from an “interesting” combination of plywood and rough lumber.  (I’m still trying to convince myself that maybe the wood could be considered rustic not rough, as in rustic industrial).  And evidenced by the splatters, the original builders didn’t mind slinging mud and paint everywhere.  To make matters worse, it was clear that the iron railing was spray painted in-place because white enamel overspray was all over the wood treads and risers.

Adding another layer of drama to this remodeling saga, I realize that the existing carpet wan’t the original after all but was laid over the same pad as the original 1975 yellow tweed carpeting, which means two generations of carpet staples.

Millions of evil carpet staples
Millions of carpet staples had to be removed one by one if I was going to refinish the existing wood stairs…

Well, I did manage to get every single staple out but you’ll have to stay tuned to see Phase 2.  Watch my YouTube video for a sneak preview!

Thanks for reading and following along.  Comments always welcome!

Rearranging Your Furniture With Style (yours)

MYDECOROLOGY =

+ Your stuff

+ Your room

+ Your unique taste

+ Your decisions

___________________________

MYDECOROLOGY means YOUR decorology.

MYDECOROLOGY in its simplest form can mean rearranging the furniture, which I love doing.  Don’t you?  Rearranging the furniture layout of a room can breathe fresh new life into an otherwise stale status quo.  When was the last time you rearranged your furniture?

So, why rearrange your furniture?  My answer:  Why not!

Simple minimalist decor. No frills, no flowers, no signs, nothing chippy or painted white (yet).
This idea is to minimize the number of decor items in one corner of your room in order to add focus and a bit of minimalist drama. Small change, big visual impact.

 

Great Reasons to Rearrange Your Furniture:

  • Easy (if you start with the lightest pieces)
  • Instantly rewarding
  • Temporary
  • Not messy
  • FREE

These are all very important key words when trying to convince your partner (or yourself) that change is good.

Start Now!

Here are some techniques that you can try right now for immediate impact.  Give yourself permission, while no one is looking.

  • Pull the furniture away from the walls if you have a large great room.  Houzz shows how here.

Furniture arrangementHouzz

    shows you how to arrange your furniture while ignoring the walls.

If you have a small room and can’t get totally away from the walls, consider simply placing the sofa or chairs at a jaunty angle. HGTV’s Fixer Upper has an excellent example of a small room arrangement here.  How and why to move the furniture away from the walls

Notice the furniture arrangement in the “Living Room-After” shots on HGTV’s FIxer Upper

Try switching the location of several pieces.  Or merely group them differently.

  • Repurpose that seldom-used ottoman to become the coffee or cocktail table by simply topping with a fabulous tray, like Erin from Sparkle did for her living room make-over:
Ottoman becomes a coffee table
Comfy tufted ottoman is a coffee table AND a foot rest.

Here are a few other ideas:

  • Change all of the art and photos around using the existing nails and hangers.
  • Experiment by moving lamps, books, rugs, and display items.

Just make a change, stand back and admire.  Let it soak in a while, then change it back if you don’t like it.  No rules; it’s your house.

Steal From The Kitchen or Garage.

Don’t forget to add unexpected style elements into your newly arranged room.  Look around for things that you already have.  Go on a scavenger hunt in your own house.  Look for items that have lived in a completely different room (or storage box) for years, and move them around.  Use your DIY skills and creative ideas to add the perfect touch of YOU in every room.

If your style preference leans towards rustic, farmhouse, or primitive, check out this idea using rusty farm tools.  Frankly I love nearly everything by Larissa at Prodigal Pieces:

Rustic farm tools are DIY
Don’t forget to look in your garage or barn for inspiring DIY decor ideas, like this one from Prodigal Pieces.

Here’s a more contemporary industrial DIY decor idea from Autumn at Design Dump.  She borrows metal screens to become artwork frames for an office, but this could work for a gallery wall with individual frames in your home.  Maybe leftover or salvage fencing material would also work.

Rustic industrial DIY artwork frame
Metal screening becomes a DIY rustic industrial artwork frame by Design Dump

 

Think outside of the norm:

  • Serving pieces like pitchers, teapots, and coffee pots must not be confined to the kitchen
Silver coffeepot becomes a vase
A tarnished silver coffee pot becomes an lovely flower vase in the living room, by The Decorated House.
pitcher is DIY flower vase
Adventures in Decorating has some fun ideas for using pitchers in your DIY decor.
  • Think floor lamp instead of an end table + lamp next to the sofa:
Floor lamp
How about this great floor lamp by Kirkland’s?  Remember, not every sofa has to have an end table and lamp on each end.
  • Adding a couple of pieces from the china cabinet could direct unanticipated attention and focus in a new place:
China in the garden
Use your china in spontaneous places, like this amazing planter from Finding Home Farms.

mmmcrafts did an excellent curved display of curated plates in a foyer:

Decorating with china plates
See this and other brilliant ideas for decorating with plates at Apartment Therapy.
  • Lovely rugs can be striking on the wall. Learn how to hang them properly from House Mix:
Wall art from rugs
See House Mix’s DIY to learn how to hang rugs on the wall and add a focal pop of color and texture.  Check out their other great ideas too!
  • That stack of serving trays in your pantry will make an awesome grouping on the wall (thanks to source: Hammers and High Heels for the idea below).  See my Pinterest pins for other exciting PROJECTS TO TRY.  We can do these!
Silver platters on the wall
Lovely tarnished silver platters can be grouped into a wreath like this or used in a grouping.
  • Move your bedroom throw pillows to the living room.  They are interchangeable depending on size, shape, and fabric.  The price is right and it might make an amazing difference!  There are millions of sources to learn how to make them yourself, but surely you can fit in one DIY no-sew beauty like this one from All Day Chic:
DIY no-sew throw pillow
DIY no-sew throw pillow idea from All Day Chic

 

 

Feeling Brave and Empowered Yet?

This is your room —  choose change!

And if you don’t love-love the new furniture layout, of course you can move everything back the way it’s always been.  But meanwhile, you found some courage to try out some new ideas on your room.  You considered a change, maybe even stepped outside of your comfort zone.  Your brain is now spinning with other possibilities: other rooms, other changes, styles and color combinations that you didn’t even know you liked.  Maybe you won’t be able to sleep because you’re so stimulated by the potential.  So congratulations for experimenting, learning, and taking a risk.

Post a comment and let me hear how rearranging your furniture turned out, and how comfortable you (and co-habitants) felt about it.

Color Palettes and Favorite Colors

Nature offers color palettes for your decor decisions

Color palettes (color combinations) selected by fashion designers, artists, and home decorators seek to intentionally leave an impression on you — from stark minimalist monochromatic hues to soothing, peaceful neutrals to dramatic unexpected pops of color that demand attention and don’t hold back.  I’m naturally drawn to vivid color palette contrast or dramatic dark/light contrast regardless of which colors are used.  This tendency toward high contrast explains my wide and ever changing range of color interests.

red wheel-whtWM

telephone pole art
Finding color combinations in the most unexpected places

italy wall shrine-whtWM

Color Palettes vs Wooden Pallets

Important note about these different words: color palettes vs wooden pallets (the kind used for stacking and transporting goods; very popular trend for DIY furniture).  Be aware of wooden pallets that may have transported food, garbage, recycling, or used clothing which may contain possible contamination from bacteria, other organisms, or insects.  Choose (and treat) your pallets wisely.  I prefer the ones that have only transported lumber:

wooden pallet vs color palette
pallet vs palette MYDECOROLOGY Tweet

But let’s get back to talking about color palettes…

Favorite Colors

I admit that I don’t have one favorite color and maybe never have had.  We probably all have our go-to color for certain objects.  Me?  I like my sheets and blouses white, my flowers a soft pink.  I have a thing for black patent leather shoes.  Buttery yellow paint is my go-to color.  There there are blues: faded denim, frosted sea glass, navy and white striped upholstery, blue-green seas and that unforgettable shade of Wyoming sky blue.  Do you have one favorite color?  Has that always been your favorite color?  Can you pinpoint why it became your favorite? I’d love to hear your thoughts on this.  Post your comments below.

Color Decisions

So let’s say you are open to considering shades beyond your favorite colors or even outside your comfort zone.  Look around!  Diverse color combinations are everywhere if you take time to notice them.  Once you’ve captured these color palettes through a camera lens (aka smart phone), review them later and study the intricate details and nuances which impact your thoughts and memories, and which may influence your design color decisions.

Speaking of color decisions, don’t you LOVE the Sherwin Williams Color Snap It and Chip It website? OMG, I can spend hours uploading my favorite Random iPhone Photos http://www.mydecorology.com/my-random-iphone-photos/ to see which paint color combinations are suggested.  I’ve gotten some great ideas this way.  You gotta try it!  I love Sherwin Williams paint anyway, and always watch for coupons and sales.

Sherwin Williams paint color app
Chip It! by Sherwin-Williams

 

Nature’s Colors

From a design perspective, I believe that we are constantly striving to bring nature’s truest colors and interesting textures into our lives and homes.

Color Palettes
I am so drawn to the color palettes in nature, like this fossil ammonite shell.
Ideas for Color Palettes
Ideas for decor color palettes can come from the simplest observations, like this sidewalk grouping in Tuscany, Italy
Color Palettes in sand color swirls
Nature’s color mixer
beach shells provide color palettes
Inspiring color palettes from seashells MYDECOROLOGY TWEET

 

Which colors combos will be the next new trend?  How long do you think gray will stay in favor with decorators?

Gray paint color palettes
DIY blended gray and white. MYDECOROLOGY Tweet

 

 

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